USS Saetia  

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Saetia Str

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Saetia

(Str: dp. 6,376; 1. 322'; b. 48'3"; dr. 19'; s. 11 k.
cpl. 81; a. 1 5", 1 6-pdr.)

Saetia (No. 2317), originally under construction by Harlan and Hollingsworth, Wilmington, Del., as the -hulled steam cargo ship Colorado for the Mallory Line, was taken over by the U.S. Shipping Board at her construction site and commissioned as a Naval Overseas Transportation Service vessel on 1 March 1918 at Philadelphia, Pa., Lt. Comdr. W. A. Hogan in command.

Two weeks later, Saetia sailed for New York City where she joined a convoy that departed for France on 16 March. After the convoy arrived at Brest on the 31st, Saetia steamed on to Rochefort, unloaded her cargo, and then joined a convoy for Philadelphia. Arriving at Philadelphia on 3 May, the ship underwent minor repairs and then moved up the coast to join her second European-bound convoy.

This convoy got underway on 17 May and arrived at Quiberon on 1 June. Saetia was back in Philadelphia on 2 July; and, after repairs and loading operations at Cramp Shipbuilding Co., she steamed to New York on the 15th. Picking up a convoy on 24 July, she delivered her goods at Gironde on 11 August and sailed for Philadelphia at the end of the month.

Saetia again joined a European-bound convoy out of New York on 22 September, this time sailing for Brest. Arriving there on 7 October, she went on to Bordeaux discharged her cargo, and then sailed for Philadelphia on the 24th. At 0830 on 9 November, she struck a mine and sank ten miles SSE of Fenwick Island Lightship off the Atlantic coast. All hands survived, although 13 men were injured.