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Naval Limitation Treaty- 1922

CHAPTER I
ART. I. The Contracting Powers agree to limit their respective naval armament as provided in the present Treaty.
ART. II. The Contracting Powers may retain respectively the capital ships which are specified in Chapter II, Part 1. On the coming into force of the present Treaty, but subject to the following provisions of this Article, all other capital ships, built or building, of the United States, the British Empire and Japan shall be disposed of as prescribed in Chapter II, Part 2.
In addition to the capital ships specified in Chapter II, Part 1, the United States may complete and retain two ships of the West Virginia class now under construction. On the completion of these two ships the North Dakota and Delaware shall be disposed of as prescribed in Chapter II, Part 2.
The British Empire may, in accordance with the replacement table in Chapter II, Part 3, construct two new capital ships not exceeding 35,000 tons (35,560 metric tons) standard displacement each. On the completion of the said two ships the Thunderer, King George V, Ajax and Centurion shall be disposed of as prescribed in Chapter II, Part 2.
ART. III. Subject to the provisions of
Article II, the Contracting Powers shall abandon their respective capital ship building programs, and no new capital ships shall be constructed or acquired by any of the Contracting Powers except replacement tonnage which may bc constructed or acquired as specified in Chapter II, Part 3.
Ships which are replaced in accordance with chapter II, Part 3, shall be disposed of as prescribed in Part 2 of that Chapter.
ART. IV. The total capital ship replacement tonnage of the Contracting Powers shall not exceed in standard displacement, for the United States 525,000 tons (533,400 metric tons); for the British Empire 525,000 tons (533,400 metric tons); for France 175,000 tons (177,800 metric tons); for Italy 175,000 tons (177,800 metric tons); for Japan 315,000 tons (320,040 metric tons).
ART. V. No capital ship exceeding 35,000 tons (35,560 metric tons) standard displacement shall be acquired by, or constructed by, for, or within the jurisdiction of, any of the Contracting Powers.
ART. VI. No capital ship of any of the Contracting Powers shall carry a gun with a calibre in excess of 16 inches (405 millimetres) .
ART. VII. The total tonnagefor aircraft carriers of each of the Contracting Powers shall not exceed in standard displacement, for the United States 135,000 tons (137,160 metric tons); for the British Empire 135,000 tons (137,160metric tons); for France 60,000 tons (60,960 metric tons); for Italy 60,000 tons (60,C960 metric tons); for Japan 81,00
tons (82,296 metric tons)....
ART. IX. No aircraft carrier exceeding 27, 000 tons (27,432 metric tons) standard displacement shall be acquired by, or constructed by, for or within the jurisdiction of, any of the contracting Powers....
ART. XI. No vessel of war exceeding 10,000 tons (10,160 metric tons) standard displacement, other than a capital ship or aircraft carrier, shall be acquired by, or constructed by, for, or within the jurisdiction of, any of the Contracting Powers. Vessels not specifically built as fighting ships nor taken in time of peace under government control for fighting purposes, which are employed on fleet duties or as troop transports or in some other way for the purpose of assisting in the prosecution of hostilities otherwise than as
fighting ships, shall not be within the limitations of this Article.
ART. XII. No vessel of war of any of the Contracting Powers, hereafter laid down, other than a capital ship, shall carry a gun with a calibre in excess of 8 inches (203 millimetres).
ART. XIII. Except as provided in Article IX, no ship designated in the present Treaty to be scrapped may be reconverted into a vessel of war.
ART. XIV. No preparations shall be made in merchant ships in time of peace for the installation of warlike armaments for the purpose of converting such ships into vessels of war, . . .
ART. XIX. The United States, the British Empire and Japan agree that the status quo at the time of the signing of the present Treaty, with regard to fortifications and naval bases, shall be maintained in their respective territories and possessions specified hereunder:
(1) The insular possessions which the United States now holds or may hereafter acquire in the Pacific Ocean, except (a) those adjacent to the coast of the United States, Alaska and Panama Canal Zone, not including the Aleutian Islands, and (b) the Hawaiian Islands;
(2) Hongkong and the insular possessions which the British Empire now holds or may hereafter acquire in the Pacific Ocean, east of the meridian of 110° east longitude, except (ad those adjacent to the coast of Canada, (b) the Commonwealth of Australia and id Territories, and (c) New Zealand;
(3) The following insular territories and possessions of Japan in the Pacific Ocean, to wit: the Kurile Islands, the Bonin Islands Amami-Oshima, the Loochoo Islands, Formosa and the Pescadores, and any insular territories or possessions in the Pacific Ocean which Japan may hereafter acquire.
The maintenance of the status quo under the foregoing provisions implies that no new fortifications or naval bases shall be established in the territories and possessions specified; that no measures shall be taken to increase the existing naval facilities for the repair and maintenance of naval forces, and that no increase shall be made in the coast defences of the territories and possessions above specified. This restriction, however,
does not preclude such repair and replacement of worn-out weapons and equipment as is customary in naval and military establishnnents in time of peace....
CHAPTER II
PART 1.

CAPITAL
SHIPS WHICH MAY
BE RETAINED BY TIIE
COXTRACTING
POWERS
[Lists]
PART 2.

RULES FOR SCRAPPING VESSELS OF WAR.

The following rules shall be observed for the strapping of vessels of war which are to be disposed of in accordance with Articles II and 111
1. A vessal to be scrapped must be placed in such condition that it cannot be put to combatant use.
II. This result must be finally effected in any one of the following ways:
(a) Permanent sinking of the vessel; (b) Breaking the vessel up.
This shall always involve the destruction or removal of all machinery, boilers and armour, and all deck, side and bottom plating;
(c) Converting the vessel to target use exdusively.... Not more than one capital ship may be retained for this purpose at one time by any of the Contract:ng Powers....
PART 3. SEC. I.

RULES FOR REPLACEMENT.

(a) Capital ships and aircraft carriers twenty years after the date of their completion may, except as otherwise provided in Article VIII and in the tables in Section II of this Part, be replaced by new construction, but within the limits prescribed in Article IV and Article VII. The keels of such new construction may, except as otherwise provided in Article VIII and in the tables in Section II of this Part, be laid down not earlier than seventeen years from the date of completion of the tonnage to be replaced, provided, however, that no capital ship tonnage, with the exception of the ships referred to in the third paragraph of Article II, and replacement tonnage specifically mentioned in Section II of this Part, shall be laid down until ten years from November 12, 1921....

CHAPTER III

ART. XXIII. The present Treaty shall remain in force until December 31st, 1936, and in case none of the Contracting Powers shall have given notice two years before that date of its intention to terminate the Treaty, it shall continue in force until the expiration of two years from the date on which notice of termination shall be given by one of the Contracting Powers....