Maumee ScGbt

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This Month in Naval History
Maumee ScGbt

Maumee I
(ScGbt: t. 593; 1. 190'; b. 29'; dr. 11'3"; s. 11.5 k.; cpl. 96; a. 1 100-pdr. P.r., 1 30-pdr. P.r., 4 24-pdrs., 1 12-pdr.r.)

The first Maumee was launched by the New York Navy Yard 2 July 1863; and commissioned 29 September 1864. Lt. Comdr. Ralph Chandler in command.

The new gunboat sailed for Hampton Roads 2 October and joined the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron there on the 8th. She got underway on the 26th, seeking Confederate cruiser Tallahasee, then preying on northern merchantmen near Boston. After steaming as far north as Halifax,;, Nova Scotia, she returned to New York, 8 November, en route back to Hampton Roads to prepare for an attack on Fort Fisher which protected Wilmington, N.C.

The first assault made on Christmas Eve was unsuccessful, but the Union ships returned 13 January 1863 and shelled the southern stronghold while troops were landed. They supported the Union ground forces during a 2-day campaign which carried the Confederate works on the 13th, closing the vital southern port.

On 13 February Maumee was ordered up Cape Fear River to support Army operations, and 10 days later she was assigned to the James River for similar action. In March, when the Confederate capitol of Richmond fell, Maumee was one of the vessels assigned occupation duty along the waterfront.

After the war, Maumee sailed to Philadelphia, where she decommissioned 17 June 1863 and was sold to a Mr. Landstein of Hong Kong 15 December 1869.

 

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