Spiro Agnew Ê

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Home
Search Site
About MultiEducator
The Colonies
For Educators
American History
World History
Election Central
NationbyNation
Primary Source Documents
20th Century Almanac
Aviation History
Navy History
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Amistadt

Civics

History of Israel
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About Historycentral
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Spiro Agnew

1918- 1996

Politician

Spiro T. Agnew, 39th Vice President of the United States, was born of Greek immigrant parents in Baltimore, Maryland. After serving in World War II, he graduated from the University of Baltimore in 1947 with a degree in law. In 1966, he was elected governor of Maryland as a liberal, introducing anti-discrimination legislation in the first year of his term. By 1968, however, he had become more conservative regarding issues such as civil disorder and race riots.
Agnew was selected to be Richard M. Nixon's running mate in the 1968 Presidential election, and was viewed as a compromise figure for most Republicans. Agnew assumed office as Vice-President in 1969, but in 1973, Agnew became the subject of investigation for bribery, extortion, tax fraud, and conspiracy, on charges of having taken kickbacks from government contractors in Maryland while governor. Although he went on television on August 8, 1973, and denounced the charges as "damned lies," he resigned on October 10, 1973, agreeing not to contest the government charge of tax evasion.

Bibliography:

Agnew, Spiro T. Go Quietly... or Else. New York : Morrow, 1980. Agnew: the coining of a household word. Edited by Robert W. Peterson. New York: Facts on File, [1972]

Lucas, Jim G.. Agnew: Profile in Conflict. New York: Award Books; distributed by Scribner, [1970]